Posted in Government, Hillbilly

UBID has ‘secret’ meeting January 17, 2019.

True to form, the gutless wonders not only decided to close the meeting to the public – they met at a secret location.

What are they hiding from? They have had closed meetings to the public before but they were never held at some secret location where no one can see who is attending. We have no idea who was allowed in this secret meeting. What venue did they use for this secret meeting?

Just another example of a group of individuals who encourage each other believing they have unlimited powers as elected officials. Patting each other on the back and telling each other how smart they are.

Posted in Government, Hillbilly, UBID

Deja vu – Remember the last time we were locked out?

The last time idiot trustees tried this it didn’t work out very well for them. They actually brought more attention to their sleazy ways during the Ombudsperson’s investigation. The summary of the report is on the UBID website: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1h5mZSpHP1iidmdBtJ9WbLoByfRhmrHKI/view

Lots of information on Kaljur’s blog, including what happened the last time an undemocratic board locked out the electorate in January 2011. This is what happens when you don’t pay attention to the past. https://unionbay.news.blog

I hope these goofs have gone too far this time. Their moronic version of Robert’s Rules and how a meeting should be run is just bizarre. https://robertsrules.org

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UBID board suspends trustee

Kaljur feeling bullied, harassed

The Union Bay Improvement District board has voted to suspend trustee Susanna Kaljur for an indefinite period of time.

Board chair Ted Haraldson — whose motion for her suspension was supported by trustees Glenn Loxam, Rick Bitten and Peter Jacques — says Kaljur has been disrespectful, and has not followed agendas or subjects at hand at meetings. He notes she has criticized the board for not following Robert’s Rules of Order — of which Haraldson claims Kaljur is guilty.

“Your actions are deliberate and planned, and several landowners in the audience get involved and support this behaviour,” Haraldson states in a letter to Kaljur. He could not be reached for comment. “These actions can be seen very clearly on our video tapes of our last two public meetings.”

Kaljur, however, says she’s the one being bullied and harassed. Last fall, she claims she was twice removed from board meetings for trying to ask a question or making a correction.

“At both of those meetings, I am given permission to speak by the chair, yet as soon as I begin to state my question or concern I am pounced upon by multiple trustees,” she said, noting multiple interruptions should be ruled ‘out of order’. “This is a blatant violation of Robert’s Rules of Order. The chair’s role is to ensure that every trustee has a chance to speak without interruption by other trustees.”

Haraldson also criticizes Kaljur and a small group of landowners for creating a hostile environment that could lead to violence.

He also accuses her of cyber bullying, saying Kaljur created a blog to openly discuss UBID actions without authorization from the chair. Haraldson says a Dec. 18 blog attacks public works superintendent Dan McGill, questioning his competency about past turbidity readings and unreported boil water notices.

“These unfounded accusations can create a liability and public safety concern to UBID, and is unacceptable treatment of our employees,” Haraldson writes.

Kaljur said she initiated her blog to bring forward matters of public interest — notably water quality and treatment plant financing — to ensure landowners have information to make informed decisions.

“I have made it very clear on my blog that I am not speaking on behalf of the board, nor have I disparaged any staff person or board member at any time,” Kaljur said. “My focus has always been about policy, decisions and actions which appear contrary to the best interest of the public and landowners.”

She notes board meetings are not open to the public until the April 11 AGM.

“This is unacceptable in my opinion and contrary to local government procedure,” Kaljur said.

The UBID website notes an increasing number of hecklers had been disrupting meetings.

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, which oversees local governing bodies in B.C., says legislation covering improvement districts does not include specific provisions regarding suspensions of trustees.

A ministry statement reads: “Any situation involving the rights and responsibilities of individuals needs to be handled with careful attention to fairness to all sides; for example, a local body seeking to publicly rebuke and sanction an elected official for inappropriate behaviour would be encouraged to seek legal advice regarding its process.”

The ministry said it continues to support UBID staff with “information regarding best practices for the conduct of board meetings and other procedural matters.”

 

Posted in Government

ARBOUR ELECTED TO CVRD BOARD

https://www.mycomoxvalleynow.com/43610/hamir-arbour-elected-to-cvrd-board-grieve-wins-re-election/

COURTENAY, B.C- The Comox Valley Regional District has two new directors.

Unofficial voting results have indicated that Arzeena Hamir has won in Area B over incumbent Rod Nichol with 852 votes to his 740, and Daniel Arbour has won over former Union Bay Improvement District trustee Jim Elliott for Area A with 1385 votes to Elliot’s 803.

Area C Director Edwin Grieve won re-election over challenger Jay Oddleifson with 987 votes to Oddleifson’s 601.

Posted in Government

All candidates meeting tonight for Area A Director, CVRD

7 pm at the Union Bay Community Hall tonight.

Snippet from questionnaire candidates responded to:

https://www.comoxvalleyrecord.com/municipal-election/comox-valley-regional-district-candidates-respond-to-questionnaire/

1) Would you be in favour of the RD appealing to the province for the immediate banning of any future licences to draw water from common aquifers, for the purpose of resale?

Daniel Arbour – NO – The BC Water Act allows the Province to issue water licenses. There may be situations in the future where regional resale could support farming or other desirable activities in unserviced areas. I would prefer to vote on the merit of each application, even if most/all of them end up turned down.

Jim Elliott – YES – Water for sale by private individuals is not something I support, particularly from aquifers that others rely on for their water source.

2) Are you in favour of increasing the number of settlement nodes within the Regional Growth Strategy, to facilitate future development in the Comox Valley?

Jim Elliott – NO – I believe the number of settlement nodes currently is adequate for development. Future nodes should be where servicing for water,sewer, hydro and roads can be easily accessed or where lot size is adequate for individual servicing i.e. wells and septic.

Daniel Arbour – NO – At this point, there are numerous and sizeable opportunities for development within the settlement nodes framework, including in my Area (A). I favour doing a great job of supporting these first.

3) Do you support the proposed amendment to the Regional Growth Strategy to facilitate the residential development near Stotan Falls?

Daniel Arbour – NO – The land is set aside as “Rural Area”, defined as working landscape in the Regional Growth Strategy. Neither a park or a high density subdivision support the primary goals for this section, and the onus is on the developer and community together to argue the merits of a change. It is important to protect designated working landscapes, otherwise we will end up with urban sprawl across the valley. This would undermine the character and appeal of the Comox Valley.

Jim Elliott – NO – Any amendment to the RGS requires careful consideration and public input. Again, ease of servicing should also be a consideration.

4) Are you in favour of stricter bylaw regulations to combat the pollution caused by the aquaculture industry?

Jim Elliott – YES – The amount of the debris that litters Baynes sound is unacceptable and somehow needs to be addressed by the industry.

Daniel Arbour – NO – Not yet. There are problems as with other sectors, but I am more in favour to work constructively with the businesses and communities to solve those problems. Shellfish aquaculture should be one of our greenest local industries: it produces local, healthy food; it relies on healthy watersheds and ocean ecology for its products; and for the little bivalves to survive it encourages us to address climate change. Let’s implement practical solutions to the plastic pollution issue. It is my understanding industry and community leaders want to solve the problem permanently, so let’s get to it before we have to enforce.