Posted in Uncategorized

Union Bay Improvement District Having Problems Abiding by Bylaw #270

http://union-bay.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Bylaw-270-Amending-Bylaw-263-Meeting-Procedures-Bylaw..pdf
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How much is it going to cost YOU for UBID to post videos of the meetings?  This is turning into a money pit with these dolts running around trying to figure out how to prevent the public from recording the meetings and being clueless in the first place not understanding what they were dealing with.  The goal is to prevent information from reaching the landowners at any cost – and the cost of hosting their own videos is going to skyrocket.
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If you’re wondering why you haven’t been able to watch the Union Bay Improvement District meeting video recorded Oct. 12, 2017, it’s because they don’t know what they’re doing.  They approved a bylaw which states only UBID will record the meetings and post them on the UBID website.  That’s where they ran into trouble.  They had planned on posting the videos on Youtube which is a file sharing site where you must agree to allow Youtube and its users to use your videos.  Easy to understand, right?
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These guys want to claim copyright and prevent anyone from using their videos.  That means they have to host their own videos.  This is where it’s going to cost the landowners a pretty penny needlessly.
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The two articles below explain in easy to understand terms why you should never host your own videos and what is required claiming ‘fair use’ of copyrighted material.  Note this from the ‘fair use’ article – parody, criticism…:

Your use doesn’t necessarily have to be “transformative” to qualify for fair use (although it definitely helps). Any use that furthers the public interest could potentially tip this factor in your direction. Parody, criticism, news reporting, scholarship, and commentary are all areas where courts have traditionally recognized fair use.

https://www.wp101.com/10-reasons-why-you-should-never-host-your-own-videos/

With that as background, here are ten reasons you should never upload video files to your own web server — particularly if your site is hosted on a shared server.


1.Server Bandwidth

Video files can be quite large in size. Unlike images—which are typically measured in kilobytes—an HD video file can easily weigh in at more than 100 MB. Now, imagine what will happen to your shared hosting server when dozens of folks attempt to watch the same video at the same time.

Your web hosting provider allocates a certain amount of bandwidth and other resources for each server on their network, based on average traffic rates that do not include serving large media files to hundreds of individuals (or more) at the same time. Too many requests for a single large file will quickly exceed the limits of the web server on which your site is hosted, and bring your site—and any other sites that also “live” on the same server—to its knees.

But you may never even get that far, because of…

2.File Size Limits and Storage Space

Most web hosting providers limit the maximum size of uploaded files to 50 MB or less, prohibiting you from uploading video files that are longer than a few minutes or so in duration. Additionally, large media files may violate the terms of the Acceptable Use Policy with your hosting provider and result in your hosting account being shut down.

If you’re able to upload large video files to your server on a frequent basis, you could eventually exceed the amount of storage space provided by your hosting account, especially if you regularly back up your site. In addition to the amount of disk space your video files will occupy, backups will begin to take significantly longer to execute. More data requires more disk space, and takes more time to backup.

3.Slow-Loading or Freezing Video

If your video file resides on a single server with a limited amount of bandwidth, folks who attempt to watch your video may experience unexpected pauses during playback while their computer waits for the file to download or stream to their computer. This problem is compounded by a slow Internet connection. Even when I hosted my videos on Amazon’s S3 content distribution network (CDN), many people still complained about slow-loading videos.

4.No Single File Format Standard for Web Video

The current HTML5 draft specification does not specify which video formats browsers should support. As a result, the major web browsers have diverged, each one supporting a different format. Internet Explorer and Safari will play H.264 (MP4) videos, but not WebM or Ogg. Firefox will play Ogg or WebM videos, but not H.264. Thankfully, Chrome will play all the major video formats, but if you want to ensure your video will play back on all the major web browsers, you’ll have to convert your video into multiple formats: .mp4, .ogv, and .webm

Now you’ve got three different video files to upload, each one potentially hundreds of megabytes in size.

(By the way, just how much bandwidth does your Internet provider allow you to use before imposing bandwidth caps? You may soon find out after you’ve uploaded several gigabytes of video files.)

5.Hope you like converting videos. A lot.

Most of your audience will likely watch your videos from their desktop or laptop with the benefit of a high-speed Internet connection. For those folks, you’ll want to deliver a large, HD-quality file so they can watch it full-screen if they so choose. Generally, this means a 1080p or 720p file at a high streaming bitrate (5000 – 8000 kbps).

But you’ll also want to encode a smaller, lower-resolution version for delivery to mobile devices like phones and tablets, as well as delivery to viewers with slower Internet connections.

Now you’ve got half a dozen or more individual video files for playback on all the major web browsers and devices. But how does your site know which of those files to serve to each person?

6.Video Players

A video player is a small piece of web software you install on your site that will automatically detect which device is requesting your video, along with its connection speed, and then deliver the appropriate version to that person.

There are dozens of excellent video players that will handle this task (like Video.js), but WordPress also includes a built-in video player that will eliminate the need for a third-party video plugin. That’s great news! But it gets a bit tricky…

7.Cumbersome Code [or Shortcodes]

Whether you use a third-party plugin or WordPress’ built-in video capabilities, you’ll need to create a bit of code to tell the video player which formats you’ve created, as well as their location on the server. It looks something like this…

<video poster="movie.jpg" controls>
<source src="movie.webm" type='video/webm; codecs="vp8.0, vorbis"'/>
<source src="movie.ogg" type='video/ogg; codecs="theora, vorbis"'/>
<source src="movie.mp4" type='video/mp4; codecs="avc1.4D401E, mp4a.40.2"'/>
<p>This is fallback content</p>
</video>

Even with the built-in support for video in WordPress, you’ll still need to construct a shortcode like this…

So now you’ve correctly assembled your shortcode, uploaded all the video files to your server, and you’ve installed a video player to handle all the “behind the scenes” detection and such. So after all this, why does your video look so much better in some browsers/devices than others?

8.Varying Quality Across Browsers

Remember earlier, when I said you’ll need to convert your videos into nearly half a dozen different formats and sizes? You’ll need a software app to handle this file conversion for you. There are hundreds of video conversion applications out there, and you may find that you need more than one to handle conversion into all the various format.

Unfortunately, every app handles the conversion process in a slightly different way, resulting in varying quality in your video files. Your video may look great as an MP4, but when you view the OGG file in Firefox, your video looks grainy or bitmapped.

Further complicating this issue, each web browser also handles playback differently, which means the exact same video file will look great in one browser, but horrible in another. I spent countless hours experimenting with the settings in my conversion software, but I never got this dialed in 100%.

9.Loss of Visibility and Traffic

YouTube is the most popular video hosting platform in the world. More importantly, they’re also one of the first places many folks turn when they’re searching for a topic. When you host your video on a third-party site like YouTube or Vimeo, you also benefit from their popularity, and folks could find your video—and subsequently, your own site—who otherwise wouldn’t have known your site existed.

Plus, the social sharing features on those services encourage other folks to share your video with their friends and family, increasing your reach.

10.Piracy

If you’re running a membership site with protected video content (like this site), you’ll want to ensure your video files can’t be downloaded by some nefarious individual and then redistributed illegally on file sharing sites.

I discovered this vulnerability the hard way, and spent the better part of a year sending DMCA takedown notices to file sharing sites, over and over again.

Because the video paths are easily exposed in the source code, anyone can simply copy the URLs, then download the videos to their own computer and redistribute at will. I found a script that obfuscated the video paths, but it wasn’t updated often, and eventually stopped working with my video player.

(BTW, one of the many reasons I use and recommend Vimeo PRO is that you can hide your videos from their public directory, and also specify a particular domain on which the video may be embedded. This ensures your videos can only be embedded on your own site.)

So what’s the best solution for adding video to your site?

Simply upload your video to a video hosting service, then embed your video into your WordPress post or page.

AND THIS:

https://help.vimeo.com/hc/en-us/articles/224976228-What-do-the-four-fair-use-factors-mean-

What do the four fair use factors mean?

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