Kensington Island Properties aka Union Bay Estates plan on adding over 3000 new doors to draw water from the peat bog of a water supply for Union Bay – Langley Lake. Union Bay has currently around 770 water connections with a water license allowing up to 1045. The 2 year old water plant is at capacity and the need for a second DAF plant is planned.

KIP also has applied to dump 1000 cubic meters (down from 1875 cubic meters initial application which was found to be deficient) of treated sewage daily into Hart/Washer Creek Oct. through May for 200 connections, residential and commercial in the development.

The CVRD refuses to do a hydrological study to determine the capacity (no one knows how the lake is fed) while encouraging more and more development. KFN plans on developing DL 7 in Union Bay. Why isn’t anyone concerned about the water?

Some pics below the article from October and November 2022 of KIP’s “Toilet Bowl”.

The Week: Ken Grant fined by Elections BC and Parksville confronted by development, water issues

NOTE: Only posted the section below about water. To read the entire article: https://decafnation.ca/2022/12/06/the-week-ken-grant-fined-by-elections-bc-and-parksville-confronted-by-development-water-issues/?utm_source=mailpoet&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2022+elections

DEC 6, 2022 | COMMENTARYGOVERNMENTTOP FEATURE

BY GEORGE LE MASURIER

After reading our comment about record low water levels in the Puntledge River, a representative of the Greig Greenway Society in Parksville contacted us about similar concerns for the Englishman River.

Waterfront Properties, a bare trustee for the PCI Group, a Vancouver developer, wants to build an 800-unit subdivision on 140 acres of forested land along the river and within a fragile ecosystem. The land at 1465 Greig Road is part of the Coastal Douglas Fir ecosystem and borders on the salmon-bearing Englishman River.

At first glance, this sounds a lot like the subdivision proposed by 3L Developments for the triangle of land between the Puntledge and Browns rivers in the Comox Valley. And, in fact, urban sprawl is one similar concern of the Parksville society because grocery stores, schools and other services are more than three kilometers away from where the housing would be built.

But the preponderance of issues in Parksville are different and mostly relate to the city’s low water supply in Arrowsmith Lake and its inability even now to meet the provincial requirements for water levels in the river necessary to sustain salmon habitat.

A retired Nanaimo Regional District engineer has told the Parksville council that the city hasn’t been able to meet the provincial water flow target during the summer months since the Arrowsmith Lake dam opened in 1999.

The society worries that the additional 56 million liters of water necessary to serve 800 new households during the dry months of June through October would stress the city’s drinking water supply and the river’s marine life to unsustainable levels. Further, because the trees, shrubs and grasses that cover the Greig property now capture rainwater and filter it through the soil to the Englishman River aquifer, clearing the land and replacing nature with concrete curbs and gutters would rob even more water for household use.

The society has also pointed out to the city council that the development is proposed for a floodplain, fragments a wildlife corridor and, while the development is primarily a mixture of multi-family housing, it does not include affordable housing below market rates.

A key question for the Parksville council is that if the city’s water supply isn’t sufficient to meet current provincial regulations, how will it provide water for such a large development? Will they need to dam additional lakes? Impose California-style water restrictions during the summer months?

We don’t usually report on issues outside the Comox Valley, but water supply problems are on a non-stop train headed toward every BC community – indeed, everywhere around the world.



More: THE WEEK: As Puntledge River goes lower, Colorado drinking recycled wastewater https://decafnation.ca/2022/11/29/the-week-as-puntledge-river-goes-lower-colorado-drinking-recycled-wastewater/


Look at the location of KIP’s test pipe – in a bowl. Does this salmon bearing creek look like somewhere you want treated sewage dumped by a developer who reneges on promises made to suck the landowners in. Without potable water – no one will be living here.

Kensington Island Properties aka Union Bay Estates “Toilet Bowl”.

October 1, 2022

October 8, 2022.

October 13, 2022.

October 20, 2022.

October 21, 2022.

November 13, 2022.