Posted in coal hill, Government, Kensington Island Properties aka KIP Costanza, 34083 Yukon Inc.

Kensington Island Properties aka 34083 Yukon Inc. and the Union Bay Coal Hills Saga – When Will McMahon Show Up With Another “Poor Me” Line

So for anyone keeping track.  Kip claimed it was prevented from proceeding with the 2011 Water Infrastructure Agreement with UBID because of the remediation of the coal hills and that it received the go ahead in Oct. 2014 and that was the reason for requesting an extension of the agreement.  Just more lies from this sleazy developer (in my opinion).  Now Kip has dumped it on the Province behind the back of the CVRD as there was a covenant preventing any subdivision.  McMahon and his lawyer both were aware of the covenant and yet went ahead.
What I don’t understand is why there is so much attention paid to capping the coal hills when it’s the erosion that can’t be stopped.  Most of the area pictured in the Record article is man made and the ocean is reclaiming the area.  Eventually, most of it is going to be washed out into the ocean.  No one knows what lies beneath as it appears to have been used to dump material including metals, wood, glass, etc.
“After the engineered cover is installed, West Fraser will surrender its lease of the portion of the coal pile to the province,” reads the email. “In the event that the engineered cap doesn’t sufficiently reduce the level of metals being discharged, water treatment of the discharge may be required.”
Water treatment of the discharge may be required?  What is the cost of this?  Again, no mention of the erosion.  Anyone who walks along the east shore of the coal hill knows at least 30 to 40 feet has eroded and all that crap has been washed out into the ocean.
According to the denied FOI request, withholding the transfer agreement was due to a “common law of settlement privilege,” which refers to protection of communications exchanged by parties as they try to settle a dispute.
Remember big shot KIP stating they had budgeted for the coal hills remediation?  Just a continuous stream of BS from this developer.  This quote from the link to the article in 2012:

It has so far invested more than $12 million into the project, says Kensington vice-president Brian McMahon.

The company is well aware of the coal hills.

“It’s going to cost a lot of money and we’ve budgeted for it,” McMahon said.

A line of those green trees along the bottom edge of the picture below are dead now as the ocean has eroded the shore line and salt water is going further in.  It’s just a big pile of garbage.

An aerial view of the Union Bay coal hills. Photo courtesy JET Productions.

West Fraser Timber to supply engineered cover for Union Bay coal hills

  • SCOTT STRASSER
  • Feb. 27, 2018 11:30 a.m.
  • NEWS

The provincial government has revealed new information on the long-awaited plans for the Union Bay coal hills.

In April 2017, development company Kensington Island Properties (KIP) sold 28.32 acres of its land in Union Bay to the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

The land was sold for $1 and “other valuable consideration.”

Read More: KIP sells 28 acres of contaminated land to the province

The land transfer came as a surprise to many local residents. The 28 acres in question are located on the Union Bay coal hills — an area the B.C. government has recognized since 2012 as a “priority contaminated site.” The high sulfur content of the hills has resulted in acid rock drainage that has discharged metals into the Baynes Sound over the years.

Read More: Union Bay coal hills on priority contaminated site list in B.C.

Negotiations over the remediation of the coal hills have gone on for several years.

A recent Freedom of Information (FOI) request for a copy of the land transfer agreement between KIP and the province was denied.

According to the denied FOI request, withholding the transfer agreement was due to a “common law of settlement privilege,” which refers to protection of communications exchanged by parties as they try to settle a dispute.

Adjacent to the section previously owned by KIP, the rest of the coal hills is leased by the Crown to forestry company West Fraser Timber. The company’s lease expires later this year.

KIP had originally intended for its section of the coal hills to make up a portion of its golf course. After acquiring the land last spring, ministry staff said the province plans to erect a “green space” there once the area is eventually remediated.

An email to the Record from the ministry said that West Fraser Timber is “developing a detailed design plan for an engineered cover” at its own cost that will be submitted to the Ministry of Environment for review. The engineered cover will envelop the entire contaminated area.

When contacted, West Fraser Timber declined to comment.

According to the ministry, the engineered cover will impede water access to the coal pile, reducing acid rock drainage and the release of metals to the environment.

“After the engineered cover is installed, West Fraser will surrender its lease of the portion of the coal pile to the province,” reads the email. “In the event that the engineered cap doesn’t sufficiently reduce the level of metals being discharged, water treatment of the discharge may be required.”

The ministry told the Record the work is expected to be completed in 18–24 months.

The ministry’s email also stated that the entire coal hills will be considered undeveloped vacant Crown land and that any development in the area will be prohibited, including the growth or harvesting of trees.

The provincial government has confirmed it will be responsible for monitoring and maintaining the engineered cover, but questions still remain as to how much public dollars it could end up costing.

“While the cost to the province will not be known until after the detailed design plan is completed, the costs are not expected to be material on an annual basis,” reads the email. “Depending on monitoring results, a water treatment plant may need to be installed.”

Fanny Bay resident John Snyder, who is the former president of the defunct Coal Watch Comox Valley society, is worried taxpayers will ultimately end up paying for the coal hills’ clean-up.

“It’s going to have to be addressed at some point and I’m not sure who is going to pay for it. It’s going to cost a few bucks, for sure,” he said.

The Union Bay coal hills were originally used by Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. as a washing and load-out facility for coal coming from the Cumberland mines. The hills’ contamination is due to residue from the industrial operations undertaken there.

2 Comments
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Mike Schofield ·

Sounds and seems to be a band aide on huge hole. Everyone knows this “tailings pile” will have to be removed and burned in proper facilities with h2so4 recovery capabilities. Why waste the time and money on a bandaide????
Like · Reply · 1 · 3 hrs
Corinne Groneberg

What is an engineer cover?
Scott Strasser ·

Like a high-tech tarp, which I suppose will aim to prevent rainwater from soaking into the coal pile.
Like · Reply · 1 · 19 hrs

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